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INTRODUCING: The Rolex Yacht-Master 42 in RLX Titanium

The Rolex Oyster Perpetual Yacht-Master 42 in RLX titanium.

RLX Titanium looks set to appear in more Rolex timepieces in the near future. Dare we hope for an RLX Titanium Submariner or other Sea-Dwellers?

Among the many surprises Rolex introduced this year, one unexpected and quiet hit was the Oyster Perpetual Yacht-Master 42 in RLX Titanium. The new (to Rolex) material first appeared in the Deepsea Challenge, the brand’s ultra-resistant professional diver’s watch that can reach a depth of 11,000m.

The Rolex Deepsea Challenge, the brand's first RLX titanium watch.
The Rolex Deepsea Challenge, the brand's first RLX titanium watch.

Rolex is a ‘slow and steady’ mover when it comes to introducing new developments in its timepieces. However, once their efficacy and popularity are proven, the brand quickly incorporates them into the rest of the collection. The introduction of ceramic bezels, Chronergy escapement, and Chromalight material to its watches are some examples of innovative technologies that have been quickly scaled up and expanded across its collections.

It’s a good question why Rolex chose the Yacht-Master as the next range to be outfitted with RLX titanium instead of one of its clear diving-centric collections. Some have speculated that a shorter interest list on the collection makes it easier for Rolex to roll out this new model quickly without upsetting too many customers waiting for the watch.

The Rolex Oyster Perpetual Yacht-Master 42 in RLX titanium.
The Rolex Oyster Perpetual Yacht-Master 42 in RLX titanium.

RLX titanium is the latest innovation that looks set to reach across the brand’s Professional models, starting with the Yacht-Master 42, a watch dedicated to sailing and the open seas. Titanium’s durable qualities, such as corrosion resistance, make the material ideal for a watch designed for saltwater environments. The new watch has a mirror finish on the angled surfaces and a satin finish on the rest of the timepiece.

The matte black Cerachrom bezel on the RLX titanium Oyster Perpetual Yacht-Master 42 features raised numerals and gradations in a polished finish.
The matte black Cerachrom bezel on the RLX titanium Oyster Perpetual Yacht-Master 42 features raised numerals and gradations in a polished finish.

The Oyster Perpetual Yacht-Master 42 retains the bidirectional rotating Cerachrom bezel in matte black ceramic, with raised numerals and gradations in a mirror finish. Its Oyster bracelet features the Easylink comfort extension found on the bracelets of Professional models, and the watch has a satin-brushed intense black dial.

The Rolex Calibre 3235 used in the RLX titanium Yacht-Master 42.
The Rolex Calibre 3235 used in the RLX titanium Yacht-Master 42.

The Calibre 3235 that was introduced to the Yacht-Master 42 in 2019 remains the same. With a power reserve of 70 hours, Chronergy escapement with Parachrom hairspring, and Paraflex shock absorbers, the robust movement matches the equally robust case. Rolex’s Superlative Chronometer standards guarantee the watch runs at an accuracy of +/- 2 seconds per day, well above COSC standards.

The Rolex Oyster Perpetual Yacht-Master 42 in RLX titanium.
The Rolex Oyster Perpetual Yacht-Master 42 in RLX titanium.

The RLX titanium material looks set to revolutionise Rolex’s Professional models. It reduces the weight of the steel Yacht-Master 42 by half and increases strength, ductility, and corrosion resistance. Integrating this material into the Submariner and Sea-Dweller is the next logical step for Rolex. While we hoped the brand would have presented an RLX titanium Submariner for its 70th anniversary this year, there’s still time for Rolex to do so before the year ends, or if not, in the years to come. And collectors are surely wishing for a gold-and-titanium Yacht-Master 42 that will be equally stylish and suited for the oceans and the boardroom.

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Editor

Darren has been writing about, and admiring the craft of watchmaking for over a dozen years. He considers himself lucky to live in a golden age of horology, and firmly believes that the most difficult watches to design are the simplest and the most intriguing to discover.


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