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INTRODUCING: Rado’s True Square Skeleton

The Rado True Square Skeleton in plasma high-tech ceramic case and bracelet.

Rado shapes things up with a new skeletonised version of the True Square.

Rado is known as the Master of Ceramics, leading the industry in the development of coloured ceramics and ceramic alloys. Over the years, it has innovated in the use of ceramics in watches, the latest being its True Square cases.  

The Rado True Square Skeleton fits well on all wrist types, because of its compact case size and short lugs.
The Rado True Square Skeleton fits well on all wrist types because of its compact case size and short lugs.

While it may appear effortless, monobloc square ceramic cases are challenging to machine and shape. This is due to the way the material shrinks during the heating process and other factors. The True Square was first introduced in 2020, and it returns this year in a skeletonised time-only model as well as a time-and-date model with two dial variations.  

The True Square comes in a 38mm case size with short lugs, which makes it a comfortable fit on most wrist sizes. The case and lugs are integrated into a seamless design, with the case middle flowing into the middle link and the lugs extending the full length of the watch. The three-link bracelet follows the case’s design, making it feel like a style accessory.  

The Rado True Square Skeleton in black high-tech ceramic case and bracelet.
The Rado True Square Skeleton in black high-tech ceramic case and bracelet.

The star of this year’s collection is the True Square Skeleton with two bridges that double as bars across the movement. A shaped dial is designed to fit the Rado Calibre 808 movement exactly, stamped with Geneva stripes that match the bottom plate’s finishing and nickel colouring on two of the watch models in grey plasma and black high-tech ceramic.  

A third model in white ceramic features a white anodised dial and bridges against the movement. The watches feature a minute track with indexes that frame all three watches with matching hands. On the titanium caseback, a sapphire crystal reveals the oscillating rotor for the movement.  

The Rado True Square Skeleton in white high-tech ceramic.
The Rado True Square Skeleton in white high-tech ceramic. The dial shows the two long bridges of the movement in white anodised treatment.

The Calibre 808 is a new self-winding movement designed for the brand. It’s equipped with an antimagnetic Nivachron hairspring with increased shock resistance and temperature stability, and the watch has an 80-hour power reserve.  

The Rado True Square Skeleton in plasma high-tech ceramic.
The Rado True Square Skeleton in plasma high-tech ceramic.

This new skeleton version differs from the skeleton model in 2020, which featured long bars across the dial with cut-outs for the escapement and barrel. Designing the dial with matching Geneva stripes creates the effect of a shaped movement for this watch. That stands out, especially with the two long bridges that secure the movement from the front and ensure its stability. The watches are priced at S$4,100 and are available from all authorised retailers.  

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Editor

Darren has been writing about, and admiring the craft of watchmaking for over a dozen years. He considers himself lucky to live in a golden age of horology, and firmly believes that the most difficult watches to design are the simplest and the most intriguing to discover.


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