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INTRODUCING: Omega’s Seamaster Aqua Terra Worldtimer, now in titanium

The Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Worldtimer in titanium and stainless steel models for 2023.

The watchmaker adds two new steel models as well as a laser-engraved titanium edition.

TL;DR Omega adds three new versions of the Seamaster Aqua Terra Worldtimer, including the model’s first titanium timepiece. The watches all feature coloured ceramic bezels and are higher priced than past steel models due to the use of titanium or Moonshine gold on the steel models. Read on for more details.  

Omega’s two highlight pillars – the Seamaster and Speedmaster – are well-known, with a long history behind them. The Seamaster is, in fact, one of the most popular designs in Southeast Asia. Further within these pillars are lesser-known collections such as the Seamaster Aqua Terra, which has a casually stylish and sporty design code. The Aqua Terra is the third largest collection in Omega’s watch range, with 215 references from quartz models to fully gem-set pieces. This month, it’s getting three more members featuring the brand’s Worldtimer movement.  

The Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Worldtimer in stainless steel with blue dial, from 2019.
The Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Worldtimer in stainless steel with blue dial, from 2019.

The Aqua Terra Worldtimer was first introduced in 2019 in stainless steel with a stunning blue dial. Then the pandemic came, and along with travel restrictions, our worldtime models all went into the watch safe. Now that the pandemic is officially over, the brand is expanding the collection with three new models – two in steel and one in titanium.  

A closeup of the Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Worldtimer's new green dial in 2023.
A closeup of the Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Worldtimer's new green dial in 2023.

The New Aqua Terra Worldtimer in Steel 

The dial is similar to the original model: ablated with a laser on a curved grade 5 titanium plate is a view of the Earth from above the North Pole, with the continents cut out. Around it is a 24-hour ring that’s connected to the city ring on the periphery of the dial. Notably, Omega uses the city of Bienne for the GMT+1 indication and London for GMT+0. The cities are marked out in yellow gold, except London, which is printed in red.  

The Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Worldtimer in stainless steel and bracelet with green ceramic bezel and dial.
The Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Worldtimer in stainless steel and bracelet with green ceramic bezel and dial.

The two steel models feature a sun-brushed green PVD dial with a matching green ceramic bezel that’s brushed and mirror-polished on the edge. On the dial, the printed or painted elements are in yellow gold, with appliqués and hands in its patented 18K Moonshine Gold. Luminous material is incorporated into the applied markers and hands to keep the dial visible at night.  

The Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Worldtimer in stainless steel with green ceramic bezel, dial and rubber strap.
The Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Worldtimer in stainless steel with green ceramic bezel, dial and rubber strap.

The watches are available with a steel bracelet with a butterfly clasp or an integrated rubber strap with grey stitching and moulded woven pattern. The bracelet model is priced at S$15,350, and the rubber strap version at S$15,000. These are more expensive than the original Aqua Terra Worldtimer, which is priced at S$13,900 for the bracelet model. The pricing difference is due to the use of Moonshine Gold on the hour markers and hands, and gold on the printed elements.  

The Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Worldtimer in grade 2 titanium case, black ceramic bezel and rubber strap.
The Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Worldtimer in grade 2 titanium case, black ceramic bezel and rubber strap.

The Aqua Terra Worldtimer in Titanium 

This is the first titanium Aqua Terra Worldtimer, crafted in a monochromatic style. The entire watch is laser ablated with a two-level city ring that features circular graining and a beadblasted finish around the date window as well as the continent display. The city of London is hand-painted in red, the only element of colour apart from the gold tints on the “Seamaster” and globe design. A subtle “Ti” is also cut into the dial between 4 and 5 o’clock, indicating the material the watch is made of.  

A closeup of the dial of the Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Worldtimer in titanium.
A closeup of the dial of the Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Worldtimer in titanium.

A brushed black ceramic bezel matches the case, which is made in grade 2 titanium rather than grade 5. The rationale behind this is Omega’s affinity with sport and space exploration, where light reflections are unwelcome. Thus, the entire watch is brushed with no mirror polishing evident anywhere, giving it a stealthy look. Luminous material is applied on the hour markers and hands, which are blackened to match the dial and bezel.  

The watch is paired with a black rubber strap with grade 2 titanium middle link, grey stitching, and a grade 2 titanium clasp. It’s priced at S$17,400, higher than the steel models due to the titanium material used.  

The Omega Master Chronometer Calibre 8938 can be seen through the exhibition caseback of the Seamaster Aqua Terra Worldtimer.
The Omega Master Chronometer Calibre 8938 can be seen through the exhibition caseback of the Seamaster Aqua Terra Worldtimer.

All three watches feature the same Master Chronometer-certified Co-Axial Calibre 8938 as their predecessors and are available from today at all authorised retailers if you wish to try them on or acquire one. 

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Editor

Darren has been writing about, and admiring the craft of watchmaking for over a dozen years. He considers himself lucky to live in a golden age of horology, and firmly believes that the most difficult watches to design are the simplest and the most intriguing to discover.


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