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INTRODUCING: H. Moser & Cie. Endeavour Perpetual Calendar Tantalum Blue Enamel

The H. Moser & Cie. Endeavour Perpetual Calendar Tantalum Blue Enamel.

The Schaffhausen watchmaker presents a new version of its favourite complication.

When it comes to perpetual calendars, most watchmakers favour presenting all the information directly on the dial, either using analogue counters or digital displays. Not Moser. The independent watchmaker prefers a simple dial interface that renders the perpetual calendar essentially invisible, allowing it to express interesting design aesthetics on the watch’s display.

The Endeavour Perpetual Calendar has previously been housed in steel and white gold, but its latest variation comes in tantalum. A transition metal that’s used in various high-tech industries, including quantum computing, tantalum is hard, ductile (i.e. malleable), and lustrous, delivering a beautiful blue-grey shine when it’s finished. It has occasionally been used in high-end watchmaking, and CEO Edouard Meylan has been interested in this material for a long time.

CEO of H. Moser & Cie., Edouard Meylan.
CEO of H. Moser & Cie., Edouard Meylan.

He explains, “When I was 18, my parents gave me my first haute horlogerie watch, which was made from tantalum. Ever since then, I have dreamed of introducing this metal at H. Moser & Cie., in spite of the challenges it poses. It took more than two years of testing before we were able to polish the surfaces of our case, a feat that few have been able to match, with most preferring to sandblast or satin-finish tantalum."

The beaten gold enamel dial that's used in the H. Moser & Cie. Endeavour Perpetual Calendar Tantalum Blue Enamel.
The beaten gold enamel dial that's used in the H. Moser & Cie. Endeavour Perpetual Calendar Tantalum Blue Enamel.

A Unique Enamel Dial 

To complement the unique case, Moser envisioned an equally unique dial featuring a classic artistic craft in watchmaking: enamelling. Instead of the typical smooth and glossy enamel dial, it’s given it a modern twist. Using a beaten gold disc as the base, the enamellers created a fumé-style enamel dial going from light to dark blue starting at the centre of the dial. The result is a stunning interpretation of a classic art that reveals the texture of the base. It’s mesmerising to observe.

A mix of different enamel powders are used to create the colours on the Endeavour Pereptual Calendar Tantalum Blue Enamel.
A mix of different enamel powders are used to create the colours on the Endeavour Pereptual Calendar Tantalum Blue Enamel.

Displays on the dial have been kept to a bare minimum to maximise the beauty of the watch’s mien. Two indexes at 12 and 6 o’clock are the only real markings. A small seconds hand at 6 o’clock and a power reserve indicator at 9 o’clock are the only details you perceive of the HMC 800 perpetual calendar movement.

The caseback reveals the HMC 800 calibre and perpetual calendar indicator of the Endeavour Perpetual Calendar Tantalum Blue Enamel.
The caseback reveals the HMC 800 calibre and perpetual calendar indicator of the Endeavour Perpetual Calendar Tantalum Blue Enamel.

The calendar display is indicated on the front of the watch via a short arrow hand for the months, along with a date window. On the caseback, one can see a star indicator for the perpetual calendar. A single crown controls both the timekeeping and calendar functions, and it’s forward and backwards adjustable, something that few perpetual calendars in the industry offer. The tantalum case that houses the watch is polished to a mirror finish all over, and you can enjoy the handsomely finished movement via the open caseback. The HMC 800 calibre has twin barrels delivering seven days of power and features Moser’s iconic Straumann hairspring with gold escape wheel and pallet fork. The escapement is interchangeable, meaning it’s easy to adjust or fix. It’s paired with a grey kudu leather strap and pin buckle. Available in limited quantities, it’s priced at CHF75,000 (local pricing yet to be released).

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Editor

Darren has been writing about, and admiring the craft of watchmaking for over a dozen years. He considers himself lucky to live in a golden age of horology, and firmly believes that the most difficult watches to design are the simplest and the most intriguing to discover.


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