INTRODUCING: Girard-Perregaux Laureato Absolute Light & Fire, Light & Shade

The Girard-Perregaux Laureato Absolute Light & Fire.

Two models in metallised sapphire crystal reveal the innovativity within Girard-Perregaux.

Over the last few years, the Laureato has been refined by Girard-Perregaux into a design statement that captures the brand’s modern take on watchmaking. The Laureato Absolute is a bolder version of the classic model, with more powerful features that make it a stunning timepiece to wear.

The Girard-Perregaux Laureato Absolute Light & Shade.
The Girard-Perregaux Laureato Absolute Light & Shade.

The latest models of the Laureato Absolute are the Light & Fire and Light & Shade. Drawing on an innovative case material that’s carefully crafted, the movement of the watches takes centre stage, enhanced by the reflective beauty of the crystalline construction. Rugged, durable, and shining like a vivid gemstone on the wrist, they are incredible to behold.

The view of the sapphire crystal case of the Girard-Perregaux Laureato Absolute Light & Shade from the side.
The view of the sapphire crystal case of the Girard-Perregaux Laureato Absolute Light & Shade from the side.

The cases of these watches are made from sapphire crystal or polycrystalline material. Sapphire is first grown from alumina powder into a solid block of crystal. It’s then cut into small discs and machined to form the different components of the case. After thermal treatment for stability and polishing, they are processed with a metallised surface treatment, a sort of chemical vapour deposition that gives the material a smoky appearance.

The dial of the Girard-Perregaux Laureato Absolute Light & Shade, as well as its caseback movement view.
The dial of the Girard-Perregaux Laureato Absolute Light & Shade, as well as its caseback movement view.

Each part of the Light & Shade case, from the octagonal bezel to the case middle and back, is perfected in this way and then fitted with the skeletonised Calibre GP01800-1143. The movement itself has an octagonal mainplate to fit with the design of the bezel. The bridges and other parts of the movement, such as the barrel, are open-worked, with curved lines that play against the bezel and complement the curves of the case. The balance wheel at 12 o’clock is also exposed so you can enjoy watching it at work.

The Calibre GP01800-1143 of the Girard-Perregaux Laureato Absolute Light & Fire.
A close-up view of the Calibre GP01800-1143 of the Girard-Perregaux Laureato Absolute Light & Fire.

The bridges and mainplate are NAC-treated and finished in different ways to complement the watch’s case design. The oscillating rotor is also open-worked, allowing one to see through the entire watch. The case and movement are assembled on a single axis using a specific screw system, and the case construction eliminates the need for a casing ring.

The front and back view of the Girard-Perregaux Laureato Absolute Light & Fire.
The front and back view of the Girard-Perregaux Laureato Absolute Light & Fire.

PVD-treated titanium lugs are integrated with the case and attached to a textured rubber strap that maximises wearing comfort. The Light & Shade is in a smoky grey sapphire crystal, while the Light & Fire comes in a new polycrystalline crystal called YAG that shares similar qualities with sapphire crystal. This material is also highly scratch-resistant, with the benefit of coming in different dark hues, in this case, a deep ruby red. Just nicely in time for the New Year, even though the watch will be available only from April onwards.

Both watches are truly striking, although the Light & Fire model truly does stand out with its powerful red hue. The watches are available from S$138,400 at The Hour Glass, which represents Girard-Perregaux in the region. The Light & Fire is limited to 18 pieces only, and the Light & Shade is in limited production but not in a limited series.

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Editor

Darren has been writing about, and admiring the craft of watchmaking for over a dozen years. He considers himself lucky to live in a golden age of horology, and firmly believes that the most difficult watches to design are the simplest and the most intriguing to discover.


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