Skip to main content

A. Lange & Söhne draws on two perennial favourites for the holidays

The A. Lange & Söhne 1815 Annual Calendar Ref. 238.032 E in pink gold.

The two models, Refs. 191.032 and 238.032 E, are fine expressions of Saxon watchmaking that celebrate the preciousness of time.

’Tis the season for reflection and contemplation, according to A. Lange & Söhne. But it’s also the season for gifting and setting yourself in the right frame of mind for the coming year. And what better way to do that than with a neoclassic model from the Dresden watchmaker? To that end, its holiday campaign highlights two perennial faves among its fans – the Lange 1 and the 1815 Annual Calendar.

The A. Lange & Söhne Lange 1 in pink gold.
The A. Lange & Söhne Lange 1 Ref. 191.032 in pink gold.

The Lange 1 is an icon like no other within the brand’s modern history. It has been a key model of the brand for the last 29 years (look forward to big releases from the brand in 2024 when it celebrates the 30th anniversary of its revival). It is itself a reflection of classic Saxon watchmaking tradition with a modern, minimalist touch. The Lange 1 is the epitome of the watchmaker’s quiet attention to detail, with an off-centre display for the time, oversized date, and power reserve indications.

The L121.1 calibre can be seen through the caseback of the A. Lange & Söhne Lange 1 Ref 191.032.
The L121.1 calibre can be seen through the caseback of the A. Lange & Söhne Lange 1 Ref 191.032.

Hints of historic traditions lie on both sides of the watch. In the pink gold Lange 1, the dial is crafted from solid silver, and the movement is made with German silver, which is more durable than typical materials. Flip to the back, and the L121.1 movement reveals the hand-engraved balance cock with hand-flamed blue screws, all of which are practices passed down from the past.

The A. Lange & Söhne 1815 Annual Calendar Ref. 238.032 E in pink gold.
The A. Lange & Söhne 1815 Annual Calendar Ref. 238.032 E in pink gold.

The 1815 Annual Calendar combines what we consider to be the most practical of calendrical complications with a classic analogue display that’s easily legible and easy on the eyes as well. The annual calendar sits between the perpetual and complete or large date calendars in terms of complexity but gives the owner the advantage of only needing to adjust the date at the end of February each year. It has a great value proposition for any watch collector, and while some watchmakers prefer apertured displays for the calendar, A. Lange & Söhne is applying the classic analogue display with a slight twist.

A closer look at the dial of the A. Lange & Söhne 1815 Annual Calendar Ref. 238.032 E reveals details about the line.
A closer look at the dial of the A. Lange & Söhne 1815 Annual Calendar Ref. 238.032 E reveals details about the line.

On the dial, three counters indicate the month, moonphase and small seconds, plus day and date at 3, 6, and 9 o’clock, respectively. (Typically, most watchmakers have the moonphase and date displays together for easy reading.) A single pusher at 2 o’clock allows you to simultaneously advance the calendar functions by one day. The small seconds display and large Arabic hour numerals are two elements consistently present across Lange’s 1815 models (except in its Exceptional Models), along with its sunk-in, dual-layer dial design.

A closeup of the L051.3 annual calendar movement that is housed in the A. Lange & Söhne 1815 Annual Calendar.
A closeup of the L051.3 movement that is housed in the A. Lange & Söhne 1815 Annual Calendar.

The 1815 Annual Calendar is equipped with the L051.3 with a moonphase display accurate to 122.6 years. It’s a sleekly designed movement that’s rather thin and still offers a 72-hour power reserve. This keeps the watch at just a smidge over 10mm thick, making it very cuff-friendly. If you’re in the mood for a holiday celebration, head to a A. Lange & Söhne boutique near you to try them on today.

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR CHANNEL


Editor

Darren has been writing about, and admiring the craft of watchmaking for over a dozen years. He considers himself lucky to live in a golden age of horology, and firmly believes that the most difficult watches to design are the simplest and the most intriguing to discover.


End of content

No more pages to load